Treating Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

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Treating Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)



Premenstrual syndrome, or PMS, affects many women of childbearing age. PMS causes a variety of physical and psychological symptoms. Read on to find out how to cure PMS.



  • Common symptoms of PMS
  • How to treat PMS symptoms
  • I Get Horrible PMS.
    Premenstrual syndrome, or PMS, affects many women of childbearing age. PMS causes a variety of physical and psychological symptoms. For some women, the symptoms are light and manageable. For others, PMS causes serious symptoms such as depression, aggression, acne flare-ups, diarrhea, headaches, irritability, fatigue, bloating, breast tenderness and food cravings. While 85% of women experience some symptoms of PMS, 2-10% experience severe symptoms (called PMDD, or premenstrual dysphoric disorder).

    PMS can start anywhere from 5 to 11 days before your period. PMS symptoms seem to peak when a woman is in her late 20s and early 30s. If you're in a bad mood or have strange cravings and can't figure out the cause, try keeping a period diary. Keep track of when your period starts. If you notice symptoms like the ones listed above starting about two weeks before your period starts, they are mostly likely caused by your body's premenstrual hormonal shift.

    What can you do about PMS? Start with a healthy lifestyle. Exercise, rest and a good diet will help you manage any medical condition. Engage in 30 minutes of brisk walking, cycling or other aerobic activity most days of the week. Eat smaller, more frequent meals and limit salty foods. Avoid caffeine and alcohol. You can also take supplements to help quell your PMS. Vitamin B-6, calcium, magnesium and L-tryptophan are often found in over-the-counter PMS supplements.

    Doctors prescribe drugs like antidepressants, anti-inflammatories, and oral contraceptives to help women dealing with extreme PMS. Antidepressants reduce symptoms such as fatigue, food cravings and sleep problems. Anti-inflammatory drugs ease cramping and breast tenderness. Oral contraceptives stop ovulation and smooth out hormonal changes, offering relief from mood swings.

    PMS and PMDD can wreak havoc on your emotions and relationships. Remember to take plenty of time to relax when you have PMS. Get plenty of sleep, practice relaxation exercises, and try yoga or massage to relax and relieve stress.





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